Home Technology How is “ICT” different from “AT”?

How is “ICT” different from “AT”?

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Assistive technology, as it relates to information and communication technology, includes special tools or software to help people use computers, software, the Internet, telephones, or other technology used in education. Examples are: special keyboards; software to magnify a computer screen or audibly read the text on a computer screen; text telephones (TTYs) to help people who are deaf communicate using the telephone.

Information and communication technology may be inaccessible to people if it provides only one way to access the information. For example, those with visual impairments cannot read documents presented only in a visual format; people who are deaf cannot understand content that is only presented orally; people who have limited use of their hands or arms may not use a computer mouse; and people who use wheelchairs may not be able to operate a fax machine if the controls are impossible to reach.

Many of these barriers can be reduced or eliminated when the principles of “universal design” are used to design and develop the information technology. The decision to plan ahead for accessibility can reduce the need for special accommodations.

Assistive Technology Project’s (ATP) Accessibility User Guides